The prevalence of metabolic syndrome increases with serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration in individuals without a history of cardiovascular disease: a report from a large Persian cohort

Kazemi-Bajestani, S. M. R. and Tayefi, M. and Ebrahimi, M. and Heidari-Bakavoli, A. R. and Moohebati, M. and Parizadeh, S. M. R. and Esmaeili, H. and Ferns, G. A. A. and Ghayour-Mobarhan, M. (2017) The prevalence of metabolic syndrome increases with serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration in individuals without a history of cardiovascular disease: a report from a large Persian cohort. Annals of Clinical Biochemistry, 54 (6). pp. 644-648.

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Abstract

Background: Metabolic syndrome is defined by a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors and is associated with a heightened inflammatory state. A raised serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation, is also known to associate with cardiovascular risk. We have investigated the relationship between the presence of metabolic syndrome and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration in a large representative Persian population cohort without a history of cardiovascular disease. Methods: The MASHAD study population cohort comprised 9778 subjects, who were recruited from the city of Mashhad, Iran, between 2007 and 2008. Several cardiovascular risk factors were measured in this population without cardiovascular disease. Individuals were categorized into quartiles of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration: first quartile – 0.72 (0.59–0.85) (median range) mg/L, second quartile – 1.30 (1.14–1.4) mg/L, third quartile – 2.29 (1.92–2.81) mg/L and fourth quartile – 6.63 (4.61–11.95) mg/L, respectively. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in each quartile was determined using either International Diabetes Federation or Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was highest in the fourth quartile for serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (1220 subjects 50.0%), and significantly higher than that in the first quartile (reference group) (634 subjects 25.9%) (P < 0.001). A positive smoking habit (OR, 1.47 1.26–1.70, P < 0.001) and the presence of either metabolic syndrome-International Diabetes Federation (OR, 1.35 1.18–1.55, P < 0.001) or metabolic syndrome-ATPIII (OR, 1.40 1.18–1.50, P < 0.001) were strong predictors of a fourth quartile for serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration. Conclusions: There was a significant association between high concentrations of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and the presence of metabolic syndrome among individuals without a history of cardiovascular disease in our Persian cohort. © 2017, © The Author(s) 2017.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Cited By :9 Export Date: 16 February 2020 CODEN: ACBOB Correspondence Address: Ghayour-Mobarhan, M.; Cardiovascular Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical SciencesIran; email: ghayourm@mums.ac.ir
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cardiology clinical studies nutrition C reactive protein adult Article cardiovascular disease cardiovascular risk cohort analysis disease classification female human major clinical study male metabolic syndrome X middle aged predictive value prevalence priority journal protein blood level questionnaire smoking habit blood complication Iran metabolism risk factor C-Reactive Protein Cardiovascular Diseases Cohort Studies Humans Risk Factors
Subjects: WG Cardiovascular System
Divisions: Mashhad University of Medical Sciences
Depositing User: mr lib3 lib3
Date Deposited: 27 Apr 2020 07:50
Last Modified: 27 Apr 2020 07:50
URI: http://eprints.mums.ac.ir/id/eprint/16887

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