Effect of Cognitive Pain Self-Management Program on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in Women with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Pilot Study

Salayani, Ù�Faezeh and Asghari EbrahimAbad, Mohammad and Mashhadi, Ali and Attarzadeh Hoseini, Reza and Ahmadzadeh Ghavidel, Reihaneh and Mashhadi Nejad, Hosein (2016) Effect of Cognitive Pain Self-Management Program on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in Women with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Pilot Study. Evidence Based Care, 6 (2). pp. 39-48.

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Abstract

Background: Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a worldwide health problem. Anxiety and depression are common among patients suffering from chronic pain. Self-management strategies are used to help patients manage the emotional distress associated with pain. Aim: To evaluate the effects of cognitive pain self-management program (CPSMP) on depression, anxiety, and stress in women with chronic pain. Method: This pilot study with a pretest-posttest design performed on 20 women with chronic pain, who were referred to Imam-Reza and Qaem Clinic Centers and Clinical Psychology Center of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, during June-October 2014. The participants randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The intervention comprised of eight 120-min weekly group sessions. CPSMP employs the principles of cognitive therapy and self-management program strategies. The control group received regular treatment sessions. At pre-and post-test, the participants completed Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21). The data were analyzed using Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: The mean ages of the intervention and control groups were 35.2±9 and 32.5±11 years, respectively. After the intervention, Mann-Whitney U test did not reflect a significant difference between the intervention and control groups in terms of depression (P=0.14). Moreover, the results of Mann-Whitney test revealed a significant difference between the groups regarding anxiety (P<0.001) and stress (P=0.04). Implications for Practice: CPSMP can be effective for reducing anxiety and stress in women with chronic pain. Further studies with larger sample sizes and more extended follow-ups are recommended.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WY Nursing
Divisions: Journals > Evidence-based Care
Depositing User: ebcj ebcj
Date Deposited: 04 Sep 2017 13:46
Last Modified: 04 Sep 2017 13:46
URI: http://eprints.mums.ac.ir/id/eprint/426

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