Transcranial direct current stimulation in post-stroke dysphagia: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

Ghandehari, Kavian and Erfani, Marjan and Kiadarbandsari, Elnaz and Pourgholami, Meysam (2016) Transcranial direct current stimulation in post-stroke dysphagia: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Reviews in Clinical Medicine, 3 (3). pp. 117-121.

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Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this research was to systematically review all the randomized controlled trials that have evaluated the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on post-stroke dysphagia. Methods: Three electronic databases were searched for relevant articles that were uploaded from their inception to March 2015: PubMed, Cochrane Library (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), and Scopus. All data was that was related to the location of the cerebrovascular accident (CVA), the parameters of tDCS, post-stroke time to commencement of tDCS, the stimulated hemisphere, stimulation dose, any outcome measurements, and follow-up duration were extracted and assessed. Finally, a number of observations were generated through a qualitative synthesis of the extracted data.Result: Three eligible randomized controlled trials were included in the systematic review. All three trials reported that, in comparison to a placebo, tDCS had a statistically significant effect on post-stroke dysphagia.Discussion: The results of our systematic review suggest that tDCS may represent a promising novel treatment for post-stroke dysphagia. However, to date, little is known about the optimal parameters of tDCS for relieving post-stroke dysphagia. Further studies are warranted to refine this promising intervention by exploring the optimal parameters of tDCS.Conclusion: Since brainstem swallowing centers have bilateral cortical innervations, measures that enhance cortical input and sensorimotor control of brainstem swallowing may facilitate recovery from dysphagia.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WL Nervous system
Divisions: Journals > Reviews in Clinical Medicine
Depositing User: RCM RCM
Date Deposited: 26 Sep 2017 15:43
Last Modified: 26 Sep 2017 15:43
URI: http://eprints.mums.ac.ir/id/eprint/4663

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