Reconstruction of the Acetabulum in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in Total Hip Replacement

Sakellariou, Vasileios I and Christodoulou, Michael and Sasalos, Gregory and Babis, George C (2014) Reconstruction of the Acetabulum in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in Total Hip Replacement. The Archives of Bone and Joint Surgery, 2 (3). pp. 130-136.

[img]
Preview
Text
ABJS_Volume 2_Issue 3_Pages 130-136.pdf

Download (623kB) | Preview
Official URL: http://abjs.mums.ac.ir/article_3353.html

Abstract

Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) or congenital hip dysplasia (CDH) is the most prevalent developmental childhood hip disorder. It includes a wide spectrum of hip abnormalities ranging from dysplasia to subluxation and complete dislocation of the hip joint. The natural history of neglected DDH in adults is highly variable. The mean age of onset of symptoms is 34.5 years for dysplastic DDH, 32.5 years for low dislocation, 31.2 years for high dislocation with a false acetabulum, and 46.4 years for high dislocation without a false acetabulum. Thorough understanding of the bony and soft tissue deformities induced by dysplasia is crucial for the success of total hip arthroplasty. It is important to evaluate the existing acetabular deformity three-dimensionally, and customize the correction in accordance with the quantity and location of ace tabular deficiencies. Acetabular reconstruction in patients with DDH is hallenging. Interpretation of published data is difficult and should be done with caution because most series include patients with different types of hip disease. In general, the complication rate associated with THA is higher in patients with hip dysplasia than it is in patients with osteoarthritis. Overall, clinical and functional outcomes following THA in patients hip dysplasia (DDH) differ from those treated for primary hip osteoarthritis, possibly due to the lower age and level of activity. Although function scores decline with age, the scores for pain and range of motion presented with a statistically significant improvement in the long-term.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WE Musculoskeletal system
WO Surgery
Divisions: Journals > Archives of Bone & Joint Surgery
Depositing User: abjs abjs
Date Deposited: 28 Sep 2017 14:38
Last Modified: 28 Sep 2017 14:38
URI: http://eprints.mums.ac.ir/id/eprint/5687

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item