The effect of a selective combined training program on motor performance, balance and muscle strength in boys with Down Syndrome (DS)

Bahiraei, S and Daneshmandi, H and Sedaghati, P (2017) The effect of a selective combined training program on motor performance, balance and muscle strength in boys with Down Syndrome (DS). Journal of Paramedical Sciences & Rehabilitation, 6 (4). pp. 40-45.

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Abstract

Purpose: Down syndrome is the most common chromosome abnormality and the most common genetic cause of intellectual disabilities in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a selective combined training program on motor performances, balance and muscle strength in boys with Down syndrome. Methods: Twenty boys with Down syndrome aged ranged from 12 to 20 years were randomly assigned either into an experimental group (n=10) or control group (n=10). Subjects in the experimental group underwent combined training program for 45 and 60 minutes per day, 3 times a week, for 8 weeks. To evaluate the muscle strength and balance in subjects with Down syndrome, muscles force was measured with handheld dynamometer (MMT, North coast, USA) and balance with Sharped Romberg (r=0.90-0.91) with eyes both being open and close. Two-Way ANOVA with Repeated Measures was used to analyze the data (p≤0.05). Results: ANOVA with repeated measures showed that knee flexion strength (p≤0.05), Knee extension(p≤0.05),hip flexion (p≤0.05), hip extension (p≤0.05), ankle plantar flexion (p≤0.05), ankle dorsiflexion (p≤0.05), and also static balance with eyes open (hard surface) (p≤0.05) ,static balance with eyes being close (hard surface) (p≤0.05), static balance with eyes being open (the software) (p≤0.05), static balance with eyes being close (the software) (p≤0.05) of the intervention group was significantly better than the control group. Conclusion: A combined strength and proprioceptive training improves postural balance in children with DS. This could be due to the enhancement in muscle strength and proprioceptive input integration.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WE Musculoskeletal system
Divisions: Journals > Journal of Paramedical Science and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: jpsr jpsr
Date Deposited: 13 Dec 2017 17:14
Last Modified: 13 Dec 2017 17:14
URI: http://eprints.mums.ac.ir/id/eprint/8744

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